Ginger

Ginger
Ginger

It's no wonder ginger has so many uses given it's incredible health benefits. Not only is ginger consumed as food, but it's also used as a spice and as medicine. This is probably due to the high number of volatile oils contained within the aromatic root.

Ginger is traditionally known as the stomach ache remedy. It has long been known to help alleviate gastrointestinal distress by helping relax and sooth the GI tract. In addition, it helps reduce nausea and vomiting. The anti-inflammatory compounds, gingerols, are the reason those suffering from arthritic conditions have felt some type of pain relief. To top it off, studies are now showing ginger to have anti-cancer properties and other immune-boosting and detoxification benefits. Mature ginger will have a tougher skin that will require peeling before blasting, but younger ginger (usually only found at Asian markets) can be left intact.

Selection Process

When possible, choose fresh ginger over dried to get higher levels of gingerol and its anti-inflammatory compounds. Make sure the ginger root is firm, smooth, and absent of mold. Ginger is also available in dried form as well as crystallized, candied and pickled. You may keep fresh ginger, unpeeled in the refrigerator for up to three weeks or in the freezer for up to six months.

Nutrition Facts

Serving Size: 1 tsp (2.0 g)

Amount Per Serving

Calories: 1.6

% Daily Value*

Total fat 0.0g 0.0%

Saturated Fat 0.0g 0.0%

Cholesterol 0.0mg 0.0%

Sodium 0.3mg 0.0%

Total Carbs 0.4g 0.1%

Dietary Fiber 0.0g 0.2%

Sugars 0.0g

Alcohol 0.0g

Protein 0.0g

Vitamin A 0.0% Vitamin C 0.2%
Calcium 0.0% Iron 0.1%
Vitamin D 0.0% Vitamin E 0.0%
Vitamin K 0.0% Thiamin 0.0%
Riboflavin 0.0% Niacin 0.1%
Vitamin B-6 0.2% Folate 0.1%
Vitamin B-12 0.0% Panto. acid 0.0%
Phosphorus 0.1% Magnesium 0.2%
Zinc 0.0% Selenium 0.0%
Copper 0.2% Manganese 0.2%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.