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Are there blast options that help treat gout?

Many of the formulations you recommend tend to encourage the onset of gout.  Do you have any blast options to offset this ailment?

7 Answers
4 years ago

Official Answer

Limit meat, poultry and fish. Animal proteins are high in purine. Because all meat, poultry and fish contain purines, limit your intake to 4 to 6 ounces (113 to 170 grams) daily. Cut back on saturated fat, it lowers the body's ability to eliminate uric acid. Limit or avoid alcohol. Alcohol interferes with the elimination of uric acid from your body. Drinking beer, in particular, has been linked to gout attacks. Eliminate processed foods, especially those with high fructose corn syrup. Choosing plant-based protein, such as beans, legumes, and low-fat or fat-free dairy products will help you cut down the amount of saturated fat in your diet. Including complex carbs like sweet potatoes, raw oats and fruits and veggies can help reduce the risk of gout. Check out these recipes: http://www.nutriliving.com/recipes/chipper-sipper http://www.nutriliving.com/recipes/mango-lime-blast http://www.nutriliving.com/recipes/spa-tacular-blast http://www.nutriliving.com/recipes/movin-and-groovin

4 years ago

This Question Has Been
Answered Elsewhere.

This question has already been asked and answered!

why am I not getting reply to my serious question to your nutritionist?
Visited my podiatrist this week. And not for the first time, I was advised that, in addition to the items you note, high use of green leaf vegetables, i.e. spinach, kale, asparagus, encourage the production of uric acid. Your comments reflect old school thought about gout management. A super herb that was recommended to me to help kidneys eliminate uric acid is hibiscus, as in foreign grown organic hibiscus tea. Check it out.
Our recommendations are based on clinical research and what has been proven to be efficacious. When providing general advice to consumers, we can not go into great detail given we do not have thorough medical history and current dietary intake patterns for each consumer. I am very interested to stay current on the latest research on gout management. Do you have any research articles that support these new findings? Thanks so much!
Just the diagnosis and recommendation of my progressive podiatrist (who has extensive experience dealing with gout patients).
Just the diagnosis and recommendation of my progressive podiatrist (who has extensive experience dealing with gout patients).
I'm fairly certain it was in a video I was listening to from David Wolfe some weeks ago where he said (and I believe this is pretty much an exact quote), "The oxalic acid in kale - especially raw kale - is very problematic." Also, "Raw kale will hurt thyroid function and can contribute to acid crystals, which can form anywhere in the body where there is free calcium." He suggested putting some calcium in water when cooking (he didn't specify an amount or type of calcium). Finally, "No need to eat raw kale to get the nutrients." My wife and I love kale and, while we consume most of it in cooked form, we do, despite the above info (much of which I've heard many times before) like it raw, as well. And you actually have at least one "anti-gout" recipe, "Gout Outta Here!" that lists kale as the first ingredient (and, obviously, this is to be consumed in its raw state.) Though I have enormous respect for anything David says, I continue to be confused about this issue, especially when the people creating recipes for the NutriBullet, which we learned about from David, promote kale to fight gout! What's the bottom line regarding oxalic acid, as found in vegetables like kale, and gout? Thanks for any clarity you can offer.
I think there is confusion between a few different things here...gout, thyroid health, and kidney stones. So, first, gout: Limit meat, poultry and fish. Animal proteins are high in purine. Because all meat, poultry and fish contain purines, limit your intake to 4 to 6 ounces (113 to 170 grams) daily. Cut back on saturated fat, it lowers the body's ability to eliminate uric acid. Limit or avoid alcohol. Alcohol interferes with the elimination of uric acid from your body. Drinking beer, in particular, has been linked to gout attacks. Eliminate processed foods, especially those with high fructose corn syrup. Choosing plant-based protein, such as beans, legumes, and low-fat or fat-free dairy products will help you cut down the amount of saturated fat in your diet. Including complex carbs like sweet potatoes, raw oats and fruits and veggies can help reduce the risk of gout. http://www.nutrition411.com/patient-education-materials/easy-versions-for-patients-with-low-literacy-skill/item/1711-gout-diet-and-management/ For those with a low thyroid, cruciferous veggies like kale and other foods high in goitrogens are often advised against. I would suggest cooking most of your greens but you can use lower goitrogen greens like celery, beetroot, beetroot leaves, romaine lettuce, zucchini, cucumber, lemon, oranges and melon, to name a few. Here is an informative infographic: http://nutribulletblog.com/goitrogenic-foods/ Here are some articles from the NL website with more info: http://www.nutriliving.com/blog/top-3-reasons-rotate-your-greens, http://www.nutriliving.com/blog/blasting-thyroid-health, http://www.nutriliving.com/blog/healthiest-foods-your-thyroid Finally for those who are prone to calcium oxalate kidney stones, foods high in oxalic acid are advised against. This is exactly why blanket nutrition statements cannot be made because each of us is unique and have certain foods that may or may not provide us with what we need. Hopefully that provides some clarity!
Thanks for the detailed reply, Krista!